Early Work

A showcase of mistakes

that built skill.

Glowing artwork
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Hundreds of times, I've heard people say they can only draw stick figures. So what story do you tell yourself?

Saying creatives have exceptional talent is a limiting idea that I do not believe. Stick figures mark the start of where great things can happen because painting

well is earned.

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My friends and family said, "what's that?" 

after looking at my first works. 

 

Code for that's ugly!

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Artists are made,
not born.

People's most significant mistake is being afraid of making mistakes. So what I practice is the art of making errors and recovering from them fast.

 

I didn't know how to paint from the start. But, I pushed through the dirt like a seed by clocking in thousands of daily brushstrokes. The remains of my early work show what was overcome.

Surrealist

How will you grow?

I started painting at age 21 after making daily scribbles in the margins of my biology notebooks. These abstract blobs amounted to nothing, but I wondered what would happen if I channeled that spark into something more significant? At the time, it felt like I had no special skills. So I wanted to become a painter to capture my visions.

My first purchase of art supplies was $30.63. And cynicism rained down upon me when closed-minded relatives said, "aren't you supposed to be learning science?"

From that point, I kept my artistic practice a secret. Next, I began skipping meals and asking friends for their second-hand clothes to reduce costs. Then, with the saved money, I purchased over $1,000 worth of professional art supplies and began mixing more complex blends of color.

scalloped shape
green leaf vector

Any skill

can be learned with sustained effort.

white flower petals
delicate flowers
 
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I would spend hours staring

at a blank canvas...

terrified of making marks. Then, when I finally

dared to draw a line, my inner voice would say,

"You messed that up," or "It was fine before. Now you took ten steps backward."

 

It prompted me to hide canvases under my bed and in the closet. I was embarrassed to let people see me paint because I was clueless. Much of my practice took place before sunrise for five years, and the sleep deprivation was constant.

However, I've since eliminated negative self-talk and emerged with a superpower! Compared to my early works smaller than shoe boxes, my murals of today show we can teach ourselves anything. And guess what? Painting is just the beginning because I keep evolving. Stay tuned!